And I thought my town was small

When talking to my parents about Uclés this past weekend, I couldn’t help but bring up the topic of camp food.

Exhibit A: Hard-boiled eggs bathed in ketchup, fried potatoes, and a hot salad of sprouts and stewed tomatoes. Not bad, just really bland.

Exhibit B: “Could I have more fishsticks,  please?”

Wasn’t there a grocery store of some sort I could visit? Actually, no, not really. The town we were in was so small that there was nary an ATM. There was a tiny, window-less store, but it turned out that all of the available goods were behind the counter. You had to ask if they had certain things, as well as ask about the price. The shopkeeper stood patiently at the counter–I had come in, so I must have had something specific in mind. Alas, I did not. When compared to browsing, I was unused to this style of shopping and was immediately embarrassed and uncomfortable. To save face, I asked about the hours and then ducked out the door.

The tiny tienda

So, what else was the town like? Here are a few picture of things around town:

The whitewash theme was everywhere–on houses, businesses, the sloping fences

The doors typically had heavy fabric curtains covering them. Yes, there is a door under there.

You can start to get a sense of the steep hills in this photo

An intriguing house decorated with gardening instruments

The main plaza

Another typical door-curtain, this time with rocks

One day on my walk, I noticed this gang of people. What are they watching?

Soccer, of course!

A makeshift bar on the side of the road

Eighty….what?

Leaving the city–the heart of the town is quite clearly marked with these entrances

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4 Comments

  1. Purexplore

    8 metric tons I would suspect…a load limit

    • Cassandra

      Darn it, I wanted to continue thinking forever that 8 t = eighty…!

  2. well at least architecturally it was pretty to look at 🙂

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